How the public sector can make the most of technology

[caption id="attachment_667" align="alignright" width="250"]Public sector online Online services should be user-friendly[/caption]

IT solutions firm Eptica has published a blog about why and how the public sector should use technology to increase efficiency whilst working with tight budgets and without compromising on the quality of the customer services they deliver.

According to a blog post by the multilingual solution for Customer Interaction Management, going ‘digital by default’ – i.e. moving services online – can help deliver “better, more tailored service and operational efficiencies, benefiting everyone involved”.

The blog has 4 suggestions for local councils/public sector bodies looking to take advantage of technology.

  1. Eptica believes that most of the queries received by public sector organisations and local councils are requests for information. By introducing web self-service, people can access a website where they can look up answers themselves, 24/7, rather than have them call in or e-mail, which requires more staff
  2. New websites and portals should not only be user-friendly – “easy, simple and intuitive to use”, they should have a name (like Apple has named its voice recognition software ‘Siri’).
  3. Public sector bodies should use social media like Twitter and Facebook to not only update citizens but interact with them as well – “Make sure you are monitoring for mentions of your organisation so you can answer questions and inform people about news and campaigns.”
  4. According to Eptica, going digital is the quickest way of collecting feedback and thus it is important that not only is this feedback used to improve services but also to figure out what people want to know the most, and then adjust your website accordingly.

Earlier this week, Eptica exhibited at Capita’s Channel Shift in the Public Sector conference, which aims to spread best practices on going digital and had speakers from the Cabinet OfficeNHS Direct and several councils.

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